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RicardoAPriori private msg quote post Address this user
Thank you Roxy, I had noticed the very emotional quality of the "Lynched" version, in addition to the accent, but didn't know what it was called or that it was used at Irish funerals.
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Jane43 private msg quote post Address this user
Of course if the lovers were of diffferent faiths their families would have been vehemently opposed to the match.
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Jeanroberts private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roxy
Ricardo, the Lynched version of Willow garden... the vocalist is singing in what my mother would have called a "Keening" voice which was typical of the way the vocalist would sing/lament at Irish funerals, long ago.


Of course Roxy, you're quite right! Keening is the discription of the singing by the lady in Lynched! It's ages since I've heard the like! Very authentic!

Jane43 Put up practical points too! If the courting couple were of opposite faiths, they'd be hell to pay, especial if the girl was pregnant! Plus, life being so cheep in those times, doing away with someone and hoping to cover their tracks was a risk worth taking! Ha Ha! It's a loaded song this Willow Gardens and not the only song of its type when we read the lyrics of 'Knoxville Girl' printed out by Jane43 too! That courting couple just must have had the girl 'in trouble'!
This has been an interesting topic! xxx
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Jane43 private msg quote post Address this user
Yes it has been really interesting to talk about these old songs. I wonder if future generations will have such conversations about the songs of today?
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EB84 private msg quote post Address this user
Re the accent.
I heard that this was a concern when the met in the Spring of '83. Phils accent had changed due to living in LA for that period and Don moving back to Nashville.

I lovw his twang in the video shot at his hotel when he talks about falling in the well and his accent really comes through.
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Redhead1966 private msg quote post Address this user
EB84 - Can you post that video, please?
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Jeanroberts private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Redhead1966
EB84 - Can you post that video, please?




Redhead. 'Don Everly On Kentucky Afield' I think this is the one! Don doesn't actually fall down the well but his accent is well in evidence! It's on You Tube! Not sure how to post the video! My next job is to find out how! I'm sure you'll find it! It's the one with Don taking two guys around his land and Lake Adela .......As far as I know!
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Redhead1966 private msg quote post Address this user
Jeanroberts -

I know the video you're talking about, I saw it on Youtube. It starts with him fishing in the boat with his old teacher and that cute host of the show.
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Jeanroberts private msg quote post Address this user
Yes Redhead, that's the one! Hope you find it again! xxx
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RicardoAPriori private msg quote post Address this user
Here you are:



Sorry still haven't got to the Cadence Sessions 2 CD...
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Redhead1966 private msg quote post Address this user
Ricardo - Thanks!

FYI: the host of the show went on to lose his arm in a motorcycle accident.

clickable text
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RicardoAPriori private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jane43
Yes it has been really interesting to talk about these old songs. I wonder if future generations will have such conversations about the songs of today?


Though I loved Adele's "Rolling in the Deep" and a lot of Ed Sheeran's, I doubt many so called "songs" of the day will last a bit over a year or two at the most. Lets not forget that these old folk songs are the ones that have survived the test of time.
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RicardoAPriori private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Redhead1966
Ricardo - Thanks!

FYI: the host of the show went on to lose his arm in a motorcycle accident.

clickable text


He does a pretty good job singing Phil's part too!
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Redhead1966 private msg quote post Address this user
I never heard any accent from Phil even when they were young, but always in Don. It wasn't just after Phil moved to LA. To my ears he never had an accent. I like both of their voices, don't get me wrong, just that one has an accent and the other not.
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Jeanroberts private msg quote post Address this user
Total agree Redhead! Phil has always had such soft well spoken speech, lovely to listen to. Don has the accent still, and I've heard him say befower when he says before at times! Both of them have speech full of their characters!
Video's keep all these wonderful musical artists alive to us! They are not simply a memory! Thanks to You Tube! xxx
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Redhead1966 private msg quote post Address this user
Jeanrobert -

I especially love how Don says 'keer' instead of 'care' in some songs. Specifically I hear it when he sings Deep Water.

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Tree private msg quote post Address this user
This thread!!! Oh my. Lol

As someone that identifies as Irish (both my parents from there, all siblings, I was born in U.S., Hollywood, but moved back when I was little, then back to Hollywood, again) I should be offended, But all early American folk music did originate from Ireland and Scotland, immigrants passing along their old folk tunes. It especially seems to have influenced Kentucky bluegrass most heavily.

But a little funny side note,... Most of my family are all still in Ireland and are all "big" Irish musicians. My dad's siblings all in Irish showbands lead by my namesake aunt, who still performs. Her nieces are the accordionist and lead violinists in most of the Flately productions. They played in the Vegas run of Lord of the Dance with him for ages. The girls formed their own kind of Irish ?comedy? band that was hugely popular in Ireland called "The Bridies". They also produced my namesake aunt's album.

The lead vocalist in the Vegas production of LOTD was Ashley Davis. The girls became good friends. Ashley wrote "The Bridie Song" for The Bridies. She later re-released it as "Down By The Sea" in her album of the same name.

Going somewhere with this,... 😂

Ashley Davis is a singer/ songwriter from KANSAS but studied Irish (both Irish Gaelic and then the separate Manx language they use on the Isle of Man that is off the coast), and collaborated with a lot of brilliant Irish musicians. She recorded her "Down By The Sea" album in the home recording studio of Moya Brennan of "Clannad". Several famous Irish performers appear on the album with her including Paddy Maloney of The Chieftains.

But for one song Ashley wrote, she is joined by Cathy Jordan, lead singer of the popular Irish trad band "Dervish". Though not an old song, "Lessons In Irish" is about a woman who sends her cheating husband off to her aunt's house to "do some sorting" and the violent (but comical) result of same. It's along the veins of old Irish trad songs.

Hint/Moral: Don't cheat on an Irish girl.😉😁



Ashley's website and music:
www.daisyrings.com. Her "Closer To You" album is my personal favorite.


-Tree
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Redhead1966 private msg quote post Address this user
Tree -

No offence meant. If you can't guess by my hair color I am also Irish
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Tree private msg quote post Address this user
Lol. Well, those Vikings got around quite a bit so you can never tell from where that red originates. Mom was strawberry haired, green eyes, family related to Eric The Red. Dad's side direct decendents of King of Spain, so "black Irish". Our little island is a hodge podge.

Therein lies the violence issue, I bet. Vikings, Spanish armada,... No wonder we can have a temper!! 😊


-Tree

I believe the Everlys are of English origin/ distant heritage, though. (?) I don't know.
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Redhead1966 private msg quote post Address this user
Tree -

I have seen a number of documentaries and interviews where both boys say they wondered if they were Irish but were never able to prove it. Don should take the mail order DNA test that breaks down where you are from. It would be interesting.

The violence against women may also have something to do with the fact that divorce was illegal in Ireland until rather recently. I know I'd rather die than marry again
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Tree private msg quote post Address this user
Well, the Everly surname is 100% English but maybe a great grandmother or something. (?)

http://www.surnamedb.com/Surname/Everly


-Tree
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Redhead1966 private msg quote post Address this user
I do love the name. I like when little girls are given that as a first name. Makes me wonder if the parents are Everly Brothers fans.
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Tree private msg quote post Address this user
In all fairness, to this day you can find very gruesome American country songs about murder. Rolling Stone has an article on all the modern country songs, by both men and women, highlighting murder.

But yes. America is just a prude country, settled by Puritans. And violent. :/


-Tree
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Marty private msg quote post Address this user
@Tree @Redhead1966
Slightly off topic but speaking of gruesome, I was trying to explain to my 25 year old daughter the plethora of dead girlfriend songs in the 50s...Ebony Eyes, Teen Angel, Where Oh Where Can my Baby Be (I’m sure I’m forgetting some) and from the 60s, Leader of the Pack (finally a dead boyfriend to keep all those dead girlfriends company!)
What was up with all that back then!?
Perhaps an outgrowth of those early violent folk songs?
My daughter was just like...you all were crazy!
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Roxy private msg quote post Address this user
Even more off topic and going further back Marty. In the late 1940’s when I and my siblings were young children and had gone to bed, instead of reading us a story, our Dad would bring his guitar upstairs and sing to us...“There’s a Bridle Hanging on the Wall” “The Streets of Laredo” “Hobo Bill’s Last Train Ride” and “Old Shep” to name a few. The sound of loud sobbing and our Mum’s exasperated voice floating up stairs “I thought you were singing nice lullabies, to make those children sleep”. My point is that there were quite a lot of songs about dead animals/pets not to mention dead cowboys and as far as I know most of the songs were or appeared to be American in origin . I think we enjoyed a good (sentimental) cry before we went to sleep!
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Redhead1966 private msg quote post Address this user
If you want to laugh and cringe at the same time take a listen to DOA by Bloodrock.

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Marty private msg quote post Address this user
@Roxy
Seems like the stuff nightmares are made of 😊
It makes me recall an interview clip where I believe it was Don said, of country folk and country music...it’s about life, you sing sad songs when you’re sad and happy songs when you’re happy.
(He should have added no sad songs before bedtime I guess 😉)
Those old folk songs didn’t shy away from the bleak, unhappy side of life which was most likely a constant in the lives of those who sang and wrote them.

And although your mom wished your dad had some sweeter tunes to sing, what a beautiful memory to have of your dad playing his guitar and singing you and your siblings to sleep.🤗
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Roxy private msg quote post Address this user
Thank you Marty for pointing out that Dad’s Lullabies were a lovely memory and not a sad one at all. Dad taught all of us to play (acoustic) guitar years ago, but I never kept it up unfortunately. Like Phil Everly, my Dad was a Gene Autry fan and loved most Country music as well. He did recite to us Robert W Service. “Songs of a Sourdough” amongst others so our early childhood had a generous sprinkling of U.S and Canadian songs/poems etc.,
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Marty private msg quote post Address this user
Sounds like your dad gave y’all a lovely gift.. songs he loved, an introduction to guitar, again sharing what he loved with you. And most of all, time spent. A piece of himself...what we all hope to leave with our children.
Thank YOU, Roxy, for sharing such a sweet memory.
See, we turned those gruesome songs right around and made it a happy thing!🤗
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BobbyBri private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marty
I was trying to explain to my 25 year old daughter the plethora of dead girlfriend songs in the 50s...Ebony Eyes, Teen Angel, Where Oh Where Can my Baby Be (I’m sure I’m forgetting some) and from the 60s, Leader of the Pack (finally a dead boyfriend to keep all those dead girlfriends company!)

I would like to add a song from later years. It is "Where the Wild Roses Grow", written in 1995 by Nick Cave, frontman of the Australian rock band Bad Seeds. He wrote the song very much with pop singe Kylie Minogue in mind, and actually sang it as a duet with her.

Cave was inspired to write this song after listening to the traditional song, "Down in the Willow Garden" (aka “Rose Conolly”), a tale of a man courting a woman and killing her while they are out together.

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