The Everly Brothers Fan Forum logo
Everly Brothers Forum

Jason and Karina, and Phil with both boys7059

Liz58 private msg quote post Address this user
I have seen a good photo of Jason, Karina and their daughters, with Edan and his wife, with their daughter Lily, but I can't find it again. Grrrr! However, I thought that these pictures were also very nice. Does anyone know what Edan's wife is called please? (Karina is on Facebook)
Post 1 • IP   flag post
Liz58 private msg quote post Address this user



Post 2 • IP   flag post
Joyb private msg quote post Address this user
Thanks Liz for lovely photos. Well done xx❤️❤️
Post 3 • IP   flag post
ChrisW private msg quote post Address this user
Edan's wife is called Keri-Mia.

Those photos are ones I have too Liz. A very good looking couple aren't they?

Jason with Phil released by Polydor December 1994. It is a posed for photograph for Jason's 1st album "No Ordinary Music"










Jason with Phil's Buddy guitar




Christopher with Phil at Phil's mansion house











Does anyone know the year of this photo of Phil with Erin?


Post 4 • IP   flag post
ChrisW private msg quote post Address this user
Liz those photos of Phil with his 2 sons are such lovely photos, I love to see them. They were loved very much.

Does anyone know the year of the photo of Phil with Erin? Phil looks lovely with Erin and the baby, a great family photo.
Post 5 • IP   flag post
ChrisW private msg quote post Address this user
Liz you had me thinking about the photo which alluded you, I had to decide what I had filed it under, found it eventually and another one too.







Gorgeous photos, beautiful children.
Post 6 • IP   flag post
Joyb private msg quote post Address this user
Thank you Chris and Liz for all the wonderful photos of happy times. A fantastic wake up call for me this morning. Gorgeous family shots xx❤️❤️
Post 7 • IP   flag post
LizzieB private msg quote post Address this user
Thank you Liz & Chris for the lovely photos.
Beautiful family photos.
Post 8 • IP   flag post
Annmary private msg quote post Address this user
Thank you Liz and Chris wonderful photos.
Post 9 • IP   flag post
Jane43 private msg quote post Address this user
A very good looking family. Phil's boys were gorgeous children and grew up to be very handsome. I haven't seen many photos of Chris; he is very striking looking. Does anybody know anything about him, is he a musician too?
Post 10 • IP   flag post
ChrisW private msg quote post Address this user
There is an interview with Phil, can't say which one I hear so many, but one I have listened to again in the last 6 months and Phil said that both his sons worked at Cleartone Strings, the company which Phil set up with either both sons at the time or Jason first then Chris, not sure. Jason is President of the company but I do not know the role of Chris. I will have to listen to interviews again to jiggle my memory.

I have quite a few new albums to listen to so it won't be for a while. I went into one of my good vinyl shops 7-10 days ago and bought 7 but not all for me, just 2 for me and 2 were not Everly albums but a Christmas present for my eldest brother. The other 3 were for Everly friends. I got "A Date with the Everly Brothers" and "Both sides of an Evening" I have had them on compilation cd's for a while but I love to have the vinyls. "A Date with..." was £10 not sure what others have paid for it but this is the first time I have come across it so I was always going to buy it.

I got one of Tony Hancock for my brother, one comedy sketch on each side I know he will love it £3 in mint condition and a double album with Gene Vincent, Chuck Berry, The Everlys and Sam Cooke, you know I am going to have to play these and copy them before Christmas!!!
Post 11 • IP   flag post
Jane43 private msg quote post Address this user
Oh yes of course I had forgotten about the company Phil set up for his sons. I'm sure it is still going.

Chris I am very jealous of your purchases. Was it the original A Date With The Everly Brothers? I would love to own that one; I did have the LP but without its cover. Tony Hancock was a very funny man but tragic at the same time; his radio shows were legendary. Did your brother like Jake Thackeray? My brother had his LP and used to play it a lot - some bits of it were a bit cheeky. My brother loved Johnny Ray too and used to play Tonight Josephine all the time.
Post 12 • IP   flag post
ChrisW private msg quote post Address this user
It is the original Jane, both of the vinyls are. A Date with the Everly Brothers is in need of TLC on the cover but it opens out Jane like a double LP would, a couple of the photos even though from the same photo shoot are new to me. Both sides of an Evening is in better condition cover wise, it is good that the shop I go to puts them in strong polythene covers to protect them from further damage. I go once a year to this vinyl shop on my holidays but I can ring up and ask if anything new is in and they will send me them for the price of the postage plus albums. My home town has a great vinyl shop who is on line too and 2 more stalls on the market so I frequent them often. The shop guy will save me Everly Stuff now for me to look over them first. He has moved to larger premises because vinyl has taken off massively now. I have several things saved about the vinyls situation. I will look them out later and post them.
Post 13 • IP   flag post
Joyb private msg quote post Address this user
Sounds like you have some good contacts for vinyl records Chris I have both those from when they were first released probably cost about30 shilling to £2 in those days (sorry) but it was a lot to me a schoolgirl on pocket money. I don't play them now so they are in good condition I play the CDs instead. Don't know what my daughters will do with my Everly collection when I pop my clogs!! Good hunting for more records you're going to be busy xx❤️🎸💽
Post 14 • IP   flag post
Jane43 private msg quote post Address this user
I will have to see if there are any vinyl shops in adjacent towns to us as I would dearly love that 'Date' LP for old time's sake. I bought mine in 1961 when I was on holiday in London with a friend. We visited one of the markets and one stall had the LP minus it's cover at a reduced price. I had only just started work and didn't have much money so I bought it. I played and played it when I got home but when we thought LPs were a thing of the past it was unfortunately one of the ones we disposed of.

Joy we funded a lot of our early record purchases, fan magazines, cinemas and concerts through pocket money from our parents. Things must have been cheaper then as our parents couldn't afford to give us much but we had such good times.
Post 15 • IP   flag post
ChrisW private msg quote post Address this user
David Bowie helps vinyl sales hit 25-YEAR high as CDs and downloads plummet

AS STREAMING continues to kill off the sales of CDs and digital downloads, it seems vinyls are still enjoying a healthy resurgence in popularity.

David Bowie was part of the vinyl resurgence in 2016, after he passed away in January




Thanks in part to Record Store Day and the nostalgia effect, sales of the classic format hit a 25-year high in 2016, according to the BPI.

With 3.2 million records sold, the total was a huge 53% up on 2015, with David Bowie’s "Blackstar" the most-purchased.

The death of Bowie triggered a huge upsurge in purchases, while Amy Winehouse’s Back To Black - released in 2006 - was the second most-bought, ahead of Guardians Of The Galaxy Mix 1.

Radiohead’s A Moon Shaped Pool came in fourth, with Fleetwood Mac’s classic Rumours at No5 and The Stone Roses’ eponymous collection at No6.


The icon's discography sold extremely well, including his new album Blackstar





Amy Winehouse's Back To Black also sold strongly





Further down the Top 10, Bob Marley’s Legend ended the year at No7, The Beatles’ Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band was No8, Prince’s Purple Rain No9 and Nirvana’s Nevermind No10.

Despite its rising numbers, however, it’s important to note that vinyls still only account for 2.6% of all music sales.

In contrast, 47.3 million CDs were purchased in 2016, a fall of 11.7% on 2015, while downloads plummeted by 29.6% with just 18.1 million albums bought.

In contrast, 32.6 million were bought online when the download market was at its peak four years ago.

It is now widely believed that streaming services such as Spotify and Apple Music are steadily eating into actual sales, giving the music industry a crisis in terms of revenue.


Drake had the year's top single








When Bowie decided to bring his new album out on vinyl see above #32 it made a big impact on vinyl sales. The difference between 2015 and 2016 is phenomenal. Oasis together and as solo artists Liam and Noel Gallagher have both brought out albums on vinyl. Liam Gallagher is bringing his new album out shortly and it will be interesting to see which he chooses, cd or vinyl or both. Many artists are going back to vinyl because of the feel of it in your hand and the excitement of putting it onto a turntable and placing the needle on the album.


With 3.2 million records sold, the total was a huge 53% up on 2015, with David Bowie’s "Blackstar" the most-purchased.

Many of us have many vinyls by the Everly Brothers and solo albums by Phil and Don and we still continue to buy them.
Post 16 • IP   flag post
ChrisW private msg quote post Address this user
Records come round again: Sony to open vinyl factory in Japan

Major label’s Japanese arm to build new vinyl-pressing plant to keep up with growing demand for reissues and new releases on retro format.



A Tokyo record store manager shows off a period Japanese pressing of The Beatles’ final studio album Let It Be. Photograph: Toshifumi Kitamura/AFP/Getty Images

It has been dismissed as the niche domain of hipsters who don’t even have turntables and nostalgic dads buying countless reissues of Dark Side Of the Moon. But the resurrection of vinyl has been given major label backing, with the announcement by Sony Music that it will restart the manufacture of its own records.

The Japanese arm of Sony Music announced it would open its own record-pressing plant in March next year to cope with the huge demand for vinyl in the country.

Sony Music Japan shut down its in-house vinyl pressing production in 1989 after the advent of CDs, which entered the market in 1982 and were dominantfor the next two decades.

However, in a trend mirrored worldwide, vinyl sales in Japan have rocketed over the past four years and the country’s sole vinyl-pressing factory is unable to cope with demand, prompting Sony to step in.

It is a similar story in Europe, where most vinyl for major and independent labels is pressed by just two plants, GZ media based in the Czech Republic, and Record Industry in the Netherlands. However, their combined capacity of more than 100,000 records per day is not enough to keep up with global appetite.

“It’s actually too good,” said Record Industry’s owner, Ton Vermeulen, last year. “Demand is sky-high and we’re having to turn people away, which I don’t like doing.”

The boom in vinyl sales is attributed to two factors: older generations who have long been attached to the format, and also a younger audience used to digital forms of music who want to own a physical format; with CDs in decline, vinyl has become a popular alternative.

“A lot of young people buy songs that they hear and love on streaming services,” said Michinori Mizuno, chief executive of Sony Music Japan.





Factory worker Aga Dolega-Lawry places a master record into a pressing machine to make copies of Definitely Maybe by Oasis at The Vinyl Factory in Hayes, UK. Photograph: Chris J Ratcliffe/Getty Images

The decision by Sony to invest in its own vinyl-pressing plant is currently limited to Japan. The records released will primarily be older Japanese reissues, and some new albums, and the records will mainly be sold in that country.




Nonetheless, the decision has wider implications for the global music industry, which has experienced a surprisingly fast reversal of fortunes this year thanks to the phenomenon of streaming and the worldwide clamour for vinyl.

The surge in demand for vinyl in the UK and Europe, propelled by events such as Record Store Day, has put enormous pressure on few remaining pressing plants. If sales continue to climb – 3.2m vinyl records were sold in the UK in 2016, up 53% on the year before – Sony may not be the only label wanting its own manufacturing plants, as was common practice in the 1970s and 1980s.

Mark Mulligan, a music industry analyst, is not surprised by Sony’s move. “There’s no doubt vinyl is a market that will keep growing – even now globally there’s not enough capacity for making vinyl to meet the demand,” he said. “As a result the pressing plants can charge the labels a really high premium. So there may well be a profit incentive for more labels to reopen their own plants.”

However, Mulligan said the move would “require a lot of investment, not just in materials but also in expertise, training people up”.

“At the moment, consumers are willing to pay a high premium for vinyl – people will happily pay £40 for a limited edition record – and so labels are still making a wide profit margin. But if demand continues to rise, I can see labels wanting to take control of their own destiny when it comes to producing vinyl, so this may be repeated by others in the future. It’s all tied in to supply and demand.”

Fittingly, Record Industry is based in an old Sony Records vinyl plant bought in 1998 by Vermeulen, a Dutch former DJ, to press dance records. After a tricky patch seven years ago, the plant is on course to press 11m records this year – more than double the amount pressed in 2014. About 60% were reissues of old music but new records pressed in the factory included recordings by Jamiroquai, Lady Gaga and Beth Ditto.

Sales manager Anouk Rijnders said she was not worried by Sony’s move to press its own vinyl as it was primarily for the Asian market.

“For us it’s not a concern ... I don’t expect huge levels of production from them for at least the first few years,” she said. “We produce 40,000 to 50,000 records a day, but making vinyl is a very delicate process you need the people and the knowledge to do it, so I think they might struggle with that.

“I do think we are expecting to see vinyl sales rise for another two or years. It is not a passing fad, I think the return of vinyl is something that will continue for years to come.”


"Factory worker Aga Dolega-Lawry places a master record into a pressing machine to make copies of Definitely Maybe by Oasis at The Vinyl Factory in Hayes, UK. Photograph: Chris J Ratcliffe/Getty Images"

This album by Oasis was first out in 1994, so for Sony to do this is great news. Streaming etc is destroying the market sales of albums.
Post 17 • IP   flag post
44182 17 17
Log in or sign up to compose a reply.
destitute